Blind people could one day see with high-tech glasses (which have the backing of Stevie Wonder!) – Daily Mail

It might sound like something out of Blade Runner.

But science is edging closer towards allowing blind people to see again — without using their eyes.

Researchers are developing a pair of high-tech glasses with a built-in camera that ping images wirelessly to the brain.

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It might sound like something out of Blade Runner.

But science is edging closer towards allowing blind people to see again — without using their eyes.

Researchers are developing a pair of high-tech glasses with a built-in camera that ping images wirelessly to the brain.

The gadget bypasses nerves between the eyes and the brain, which become damaged in most cases of blindness.

A team of Dutch experts are trialling it in Eindhoven, which has been described as ‘the place to be’ when it comes to blindness research.

Similar technology has been backed by legendary American musician Stevie Wonder who lost his sight as a baby.

A number of experimental therapies and gadgets for incurable blindness have emerged over the past decade amid medical advances.

Among those currently in the works are bionic eyes being trialled in the US and UK, and a trial using gene-editing tool CRISPR to cure genetic blindness.     

This graphic representation gives an idea of how the glasses would work in practice 

Stevie Wonder, now 71-years-old, who made such hits as ‘Superstition’ and ‘Isn’t She Lovely’ became blind shortly after he was born and has been impressed by similar glasses to the ones being developed

How do the glasses work? 

What’s the technology behind the glasses?

An in-built camera takes a picture of the object, place, or person a blind individual wants to identify.

A computer inside the glasses then process the image that is then transmitted wirelessly using radio waves.

A transmitter installed under the blind person’s skin near the back of their neck/skull then picks up this signal.

The signal is then converted into electrical messages which are sent via over 1,000 electrodes connected to the blind person’s visual cortex.

These electrical messages active parts of brain which would normally process similar information from the eyes, creating an image a blind person can see.

Where is it being developed?

In The Netherlands. 

Who is working in it?

A consortium of Dutch research organisations are working on the project, called NESTOR.   

It includes scientists from The Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, the University of Twente, Radboud University, Maastricht University, and Eindhoven University of Technology. 

What stage are the glasses at?

Scientists have tested the implant on blind monkeys which, according to scientists involved, were able to recognise ‘characters, moving objects and lines’.

They are now …….

Source: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-10788753/Blind-people-one-day-high-tech-glasses-backing-Stevie-Wonder.html

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